Perception Of Prominence By Estonian And English Listeners

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NINJAL ICPP2019 Program

[2-21] Asymmetric prominence of correlates of wh-words in San Martín Peras Mixtec Andrew Hedding (UC Santa Cruz) [2-22] Categorization of Cantonese lexical tones by Japanese-speaking novice listeners and learners of Chinese Mandarin Wong Yee Ping (Sophia University)

Cross-linguistic perception of Thai tones is shaped by the

native speakers of Estonian, English, and Spanish Linguistic relevance of a dimension in L1 shapes the brain response to L2 contrasts (with MMN data) Nenonen, Shestakova, Huotilainen, & Näätänen, 2003 We predict accuracy of cross-language tone perception based on prominence of pitch in the L1

Interactive prosodic marking of focus, boundary and newness

and Xu, 2012, Zhang, Wang and Wu, 2012; Estonian: Sahkai, Kalvik and Mihkla, 2013]. The reduction of post-focus F 0 and intensity is known as post-focus compression or PFC [Xu, Chen and Wang, 2012], and it is found to be critical for focus perception in at least some of these languages [Vainio et al, 2003 for Finnish; Rump and Collier, 1996

Class 14: Structure above the segment II To do Overview: 1 grid

English phrasal stress rule (a.k.a. nuclear stress rule): place main stress on last word of phrase1 But sometimes main stress ends up several syllables from the end of the phrase makes for an awkward rule Example from Hayes: hypothètical ímitators (or maybe hỳpothetical ímitators ). Grid version of the rule is local:

The Acoustics of Word Stress in Czech as a Function of

to correlate very well with stress level or perception results but Spectral Emphasis, a related measure found to correlate with vocal effort [15] has been shown to correlate with stress in studies of Dutch [16, 17]. It has also been shown to play a role in American English [18, 19], British English [4], Italian [6] and Swedish [7, 8, 20].

Domain of the Estonian Quantity Degrees: Evidence from Words

Estonian listeners and English listeners react in a similar binary way to the ternary opposition of durational relationships of syllables (2:3, 3:2 and 2:1; Q1, Q2, Q3 respectively): they can discriminate whether the second syllable is longer (Q1) or shorter (Q2, Q3) than the first syllable whereas the gradational difference (3:2 and 2:1)

NINJAL ICPP2019 Preliminary Program

[2-22] Asymmetric prominence of correlates of wh-words in San Martín Peras Mixtec Andrew Hedding (UC Santa Cruz) [2-23] Categorization of Cantonese lexical tones by Japanese-speaking novice listeners and learners of Chinese Mandarin Wong Yee Ping (Sophia University)

DURATION AFFECTS VOWEL PERCEPTION IN ESTONIAN AND FINNISH

American English differences in vowel duration which correlate with vowel height distinctions are actively manipulated by the speaker and exploited as a cue to vowel height differences. (Solé, Ohala [to appear]). 3.Experimentalsetup Estonian and Finnish vowel systems are matching well except for the non-low back vowel / / occurring only in

International Congress of Phonetic Sciences ICPhS 2019

265 James Whang Perception of Japanese vowel length by Australian English listeners Phonetics of second and foreign language acquisition 328 Olga Dmitrieva Language attitudes affect perceived intelligibility, proficiency, and accentedness of non-native speech Phonetics of second and foreign language acquisition

Lexical stress perception as a function of acoustic

ies. From the previous perception study we know that acoustic syllable prominence affects perceived syllable prominence. But there is also a possibility that listeners' perception may be bi-ased by expectations based on the listeners' native language. The main result is that there are great similarities between the

Speech Prosody 2004 ISCAArchive

regard to perception of prominence, amplitude cues overrode duration cues for American English listeners, while for Estonian listeners, duration cues were more important. This paper examines the perception by American English and Japanese listeners of American English contrastive focus; specifically, contrastively emphasized digits in a read

Linguistic Prominence of Pitch within the Native Language

classic case of the L1 shaping perception of non-native segmentals is the /l/~/r/ distinction in English for L1 speakers of Japanese. The lack of a contrast between /l/ and /r/ in their L1 causes Japanese listeners to associate either to the flap in Japanese in perception despite being able to produce the two

Lecce, 17-19 June 2019 Bari, 20 June 2019

Perceptual evaluation of post-focal prominence in Italian by L1 and L2 naïve listeners 15:30 16:00 Gilbert Ambrazaitis Multimodality in prominence production and its sensitivity for lexical prosody 16:00 16:30 Coffee break 16:30 17:30 Poster session 4 17:30 18:00 Fabian Santiago and Paolo Mairano

The Early Phase of /ɹ/ Production © The Author(s) 2014

learners from different L1 backgrounds who had more than 10 years of LOR. Perception and pro-duction accuracy depended on the overall prominence of the duration features in the L1: Speakers of Estonian, a quantity language, outperformed speakers of English, which makes some use of

14th Annual Conference of the International Speech

The Influence of F0 Contour Continuity on Prominence Perception 230 Hansjorg Mixdorff, Oliver Niebuhr Native English Listeners' Perceptions of Prosody in L1 and L2 Reading 235 Caroline L. Smith, Paul Edmunds

Thai Rate-Varied Vowel Length Perception and the Impact of

work comparing Thai and non-native listeners (Chinese and English) in their perception of Thai vowel length and homologous non-speech duration stimuli revealed that, while all groups demon- strated similar activation patterns when listening to non-speech, specific language-related brain

Observations on British and Singaporean perception of prominence

Singaporean perception of prominence on SgE speech samples. The BrE listeners hear prominence as following the rules of stress in standard English, even when the final syllable is longer. In contrast, greater length in the final syllable is more likely to trigger the perception of syllable‐

Towards a typology of prominence perception: the role of duration

for instance, that Estonian listeners were more responsive to duration cues than English listeners [9]: this is potentially attributable to the greater role duration plays in the Estonian quantity system. This suggests that the prosodic structure of listenersÕ native languages significantly influence s their perception of prominence.

In memoriam: Ilse Lehiste (1922 2010)

examples are her collaboration with Robert Fox on differences between Estonian and English speakers in their perceptual weighting of cues to prominence (Lehiste & Fox 1986) and her collaboration with Jaan Ross on many aspects of the intersection of rhythm and tune in folk music in the Baltic Sprachbund (e.g. Ross & Lehiste 1994, 1998, 2001).

Should rhythm metrics take account of fundamental frequency?

asked English speakers to rate synthetic /pa/ monosyllables on a 7-point duration scale: dynamic stimuli were generally perceived as longer than level stimuli. However, similar experiments with native speakers of other languages have failed to replicate this finding. Rosen (1977a) presented Swedish listeners with

Cross-linguistic perception of - vance schaefer

and English listeners suggest that this fact plays an important role Consistent with findings that stress constrains lexical access only to a limited extent in English (Cooper, Cutler & Wales, 2002) Perhaps Koreans are more accurate because of their L2 English? Alternatively, the effect could be due to exposure to a pitch-accent dialect.

1ST September: General oral sessions

How do Chinese- speakers of English process pitch in English words? An ERP study of L1-tone effects on L2-intonation Marta Ortega-Llebaria & Kim B. Muth Distinct listening patterns for cross-language listeners in the perception of sandhied tones in the Nanjing dialect Xin Li & René Kager 13:00-14:00 Lunch, Grimond Foyer 14:00-15:30 Regular session

THE EARLY PHASE OF /ɹ/ PRODUCTION DEVELOPMENT IN ADULT

Perception and production accuracy depended on the overall prominence of the duration features in the L1: speakers of Estonian, a quantity language, outperformed speakers of English, which makes some use of durational cues, who, in turn, outperformed speakers of Spanish, which has no phonemic length distinctions.

Paper Presentations of Speech Prosody 2020 (titles)

148Silent and oral sentence reading in Estonian: investigating the effect of phonetic quantity on eye movements 178Analysis of the factors involved in person-directed pointing gestures in dialogue speech 216Word prominence ratings in Swedish television news readings effects of pitch accents and head movements

P.O. Box 9, Helsinki FI-00014, Finland

perception of quantity in both Finnish5,6 and Estonian.4,16 It is not clear how the above approach would account for these perceptual effects. Second, there is evidence indicating that the tonal means to achieve prominence in the form of a con-trastive accent/prosodic focus vary depending on the position

University of Groningen Prosodic processes in language and

Perception 32 (3): 341-365. Donzel, M. E. van (1997). Perception of discourse boundaries and prominence in spontaneous Dutch speech. Working Papers Lund University 46. Department of Linguistics and Phonetics: 5-23. Donzel, M. E. van (1999). Prosodic aspects of information structure in discourse. PhD Dissertation, University of Amsterdam.

Izumi Takiguchi Sophia University/ JSPS Research Fellow

Speech perception and linguistic experience: issues in cross-language research (pp. 233-277). Timonium, Maryland: York Press. McAllister, R., Flege, J. E. & Piske, T. (2002). The influence of L2 on the acquisition of Swedish quantity by native speakers of Spanish, English and Estonian. Journal of Phonetics, 30, 229-258.

The Berkeley Linguistics Society 35 February 14-16, 2009

perceptual cues for naive listeners' prominence perception Marika Lekakou, Kriszta Szendroi: Greek Determiner Spreading without a DP-internal Focus Phrase Gwanhi Yun: Effects of Coda Voicing on the Onsets with L2 Learner Opening Remarks - 370 Dwinelle Schedule At-a-glance Berkeley Linguistics Society 35 1

SP 2004 Summary A Personal (and Impressionistic) View

S accent, stress, focus, emphasis, prominence S tone, intonation S syntax, semantics, pragmatics, and prosodic structure S temporal structure, discourse, and dialogue S phonology and phonetics of prosody S analysis, modeling, and generation of prosody S prosody in music S prosody and voice quality; prosody and emotional expression

Predictions for the Acquisition of American English Vowels by

English, the /i-ɪ/, /u-ʊ/, /ɛ-æ/, and /ɑ-ʌ/ contrasts are anticipated to be most challenging. A brief review of the literature on Russian learners perception and production of L2 English vowel contrasts supports these predictions, and adds insights into the acquisition of phonological distinctions in an L2.

31 Prosodic encoding of information structure: A typological

112 31.1b. This is supported by perception studies, which show that listeners expect the nuclear 113 accent, and therefore the focus, will be final, and that a final nuclear accent is compatible with 114 variable focus scope (Ayers 1996; Terken & Hermes 2000; Carlson et al. 2009; Bishop 2012, 115 2017).

Interactive Prosodic Marking of Focus, Boundary and Newness

2010; Turkish: Ipek, 2011; Tibetan: Wang et al., 2012; Zhang et al., 2012; Estonian: Sahkai et al., 2013). The reduction of postfocus F 0 and intensity is known as postfocus compression or PFC (Xu et al., 2012), and it is found to be critical for focus perception in at least some of these languages (Vainio et al., 2003, for Finnish; Rump and

Praat Stanford University

May 15, 2021 production, perception and comprehension experiments such as the prepared speech paradigm and semantic scaling tasks. These are discussed in a variety of languages, some underrepresented in the literature (such as French and Estonian) while others, such as Shekgalagari, are examined in this way for the first time.

The nature of speech

A further experiment (40) showed listeners, typically, to take the base-value of F0 during the past 0.4 s (or so) as their reference. Study (49) was initiated by R.P. Fahey and R.L. Diehl (Austin, Texas), who tested two hypotheses about the role of F0 in the perception of back vowels and found that both had to be rejected.

LEVEL CONTOUR - Indiana University Bloomington

native speakers of Estonian, English, and Spanish Japanese Linguistic relevance of a dimension in L1 shapes the brain response to L2 contrasts (with MMN data) Nenonen, Shestakova, Huotilainen, & Näätänen, 2003 We predict accuracy of cross-language tone perception based on prominence of pitch in the L1