Haptic Illusions And Inappropriate Constancy Scaling

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The haptic Mu ller-Lyer illusion in sighted and blind people

Many researchers have assumed that illusions arise from perspective cues, mistaken impressions of depth (Fisher1970), and from inappropriate constancy scaling (eg Gregory 1963). This explanation has been applied to the Ponzo and to the Mu ller-Lyer illusions. On the assumption that perception of extent is influenced by these processes, one

A Comparison of Haptic and Visual Judgments of Some Illusions

as inappropriate constancy scaling, Nature, 199, 1963, 678-680. Haptic and visual illusions of equivalent direction and mag-nitude were found for each of the four

urrent Biology Magazine

susceptibility to these visual illusions may be engendered by prior haptic experience. Although we cannot as inappropriate constancy scaling. Nature 199, 678

Geometrical haptic illusions revisited: Haptic illusions

In the 1960s, the inappropriate constancy scaling hy­ pothesis for geometrical optical illusions proposed by Gregory (1963) became prevalent as an explanation for visual illusions. Ifhaptic illusions are induced by the geo­ metrical illusion figures, however, they should be an ob­ stacle to this hypothesis, since haptic illusion figures do

Current Biology Magazine - MIT

visual illusions after as inappropriate constancy scaling. Nature 199, 678 680. visual illusions may be engendered by prior haptic experience. Although

Haptic judgment of the Miiller-Lyer illusion by subjects of

An illusion is found with haptic as well visual inspection of the Millier-Lyer figure (Revesz, 1953). During haptic inspection, S is blindfolded and is re­ quired to move his finger over the raised outlines of the figure. Available data suggest that similar pro­ cesses underlie illusions in the two modalities (Over, 1967).